Recent News

2017

GenomeWeb – Tymora developing extracellular vesicle-based phosphoproteomic liquid biopsies

Researchers at Purdue University and Tymora Analytical Operations have developed a method for blood- and urine-based phosphoproteomic analysis that they aim to use to detect and manage various cancers.

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Purdue start-up advances simple blood, urine tests to detect early-stage cancers

Researchers at Purdue-affiliated company who discovered a way to detect and monitor breast cancer using a simple blood test and bladder cancer using a urine test believe the process can be expanded to diagnose a myriad of early-stage cancers.

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USA Today – Could a simple blood test screen for cancer?

Researchers at Purdue University and Tymora Analytical have developed a process to study blood that could open the door to detecting cancer in patients with a simple blood test.

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2016

Tymora receives $225,000 grant to advance prostate cancer research

Federal funding will help a Purdue-affiliated company research technology that could lead to a new way to distinguish aggressive forms of prostate cancer from indolent forms of the disease.

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Nanopolymer-modified glycoprotein array can pinpoint cancer

In a recently published study, Purdue University and Tymora Analytical researchers have developed a high-throughput glycoprotein array system and applied it to bladder cancer biomarker discovery from urine.

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Recent publication by Tymora Analytical featured on the cover of ChemBioChem

Our paper, “Multiplexed Imaging of Protein Phosphorylation on Membranes Based on Ti(IV) Functionalized Nanopolymers,” was recently featured as the cover of ChemBioChem for their current issue published on May 17, 2016, Volume 17 Issue 10.

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2015

Tymora awarded NIH Phase II grant to advance protein phosphorylation tech

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Startup Tymora Analytical Operations this month was awarded a Phase II SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop multiplexed and reverse-phase array versions of its pImago system for…

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Purdue spinout’s approach to building new drug discovery tools

Abnormal protein phosphorylation is viewed as a trigger of most cancers, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s, Purdue spinout Tymora Analytical Operations is using the analysis of protein phosphorylation as a platform…

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2014

Tymora receives $640K NIH Phase I for new biomarker discovery technology

A two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health will fund work by a Purdue Research Park-based company to improve methods to screen blood plasma samples for biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of a disease, to expedite diagnosis and treatment…

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Tymora Analytical creates new line of products for cancer research

Cancer researchers in educational and commercial settings have two new tools from a Purdue Research Park-based company to help them with target detection and discovery of novel drugs to fight the disease…

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2013

West Lafayette company hopes to improve treatment options for leukemia

West Lafayette company hopes to improve treatment options for leukemia.A company in the Purdue Research Park is collaborating with university researchers and St. Jude Children’s Hospital on improving the treatment of leukemia…

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Tymora receives $500,000 NSF Phase II grant for drug-development technology

The National Science Foundation has awarded a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to a life sciences company to develop a technology called pIMAGO that promotes the discovery of new disease targets in laboratory…

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2012

Tymora Analytical wins 2012 Indiana Innovation Award for PolyMAC

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Tymora wins $300K NIH SBIR grant to improve phosphoproteome analysis

As innovative new cancer therapies become more advanced and targeted, the tools used in researching and developing them should be improved and innovated too.  Indiana-based Tymora Analytical Operations LLC is doing that by…

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2011

Finding phosphoproteins

Adding or removing a single phosphate group can dramatically change a protein’s activity, and cells make use of this modification to control protein function in response to signals from the environment. Now scientists have developed …

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